Why Does Christie Brinkley Have to be on the Right Side of Feminists?

Emmanuelle Hauguel/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

Emmanuelle Hauguel/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

I'm not understanding the fuss here.

Christie Brinkley is 63 years old. She appeared in Sports Illustrated numerous times. She's appearing in it again.

When did she ever say that you have to be just like her and if you're not, you're doing it wrong? She's celebrating being alive and with her daughters. She's just doing what she's been doing most of her life--modeling. Here you have a person who's just happy to find work as a model. Isn't that enough?

When did we start thinking that there was something else that had to go with modeling? Are we mad that she isn't telling everyone what to think and what to do because she looks great for her age? And no, she doesn't have to look great for her age to have value. She has value because she's a person who is basically able to do what she used to do. When I think of Christie Brinkley, I think of a model. 

I don't worry about the other stuff, and neither should you.

Stephen Colbert is Holding His Own

Ratings for the Late Show with Stephen Colbert are on the rise, and he is definitely the talk show host for our troubled times:

During inauguration week, from January 16-20, The Late Show averaged a total viewership of 2.84 million, which trailed Jimmy Fallon's Tonight Show by just 8,000 people. The demo rating battle was less neck-and-neck, with Colbert earning a 0.5 rating in adults 18-49, while Fallon got 0.73. Still, the week was the closest that the CBS series came to the NBC stalwart in the numbers since its premiere week.
It's not just about the late night talk show wars, either, although I guess that's always part of it. Even compared to itself, The Late Show has seemingly reversed the downward trend that marred much of 2016. The inauguration week numbers are up 6% over what they were last year at the same time, which is fantastic in a TV landscape where upward ticks are an endangered species. On the other side of things, Jimmy Fallon's less political and more goofball Tonight Show episodes were trending low leading up to the inauguration, compared to season averages.
Further, Medialife Magazine reports the inauguration night telecast earned The Late Show's highest stats in the 25-54 demo to date, and it also had the most impressive 18-49 demo rating since the airing back on June 24, 2016. Now, it's almost definitely not a coincidence that Stephen Colbert is killing it at a point when Donald Trump took over the United States, but only future episodes will show whether or not this was a temporary blip on the radar or a sign that Colbert has become a master of his domain.
Other factors are also in play for why The Late Show is doing so well as of late. For one, Stephen Colbert took a while to firmly settle in as the head of a network talk show, unable to initially balance the tides between his natural comedic tendencies and his history of adopting a different persona for TV. But now he's hilariously in the swing of things, even bringing back his former right wing attitude on occasion. And it was in the middle of last year when the show had a big shake-up behind the scenes, with CBS This Morning's Chris Licht getting tapped as a showrunner to guide the show through some creative changes. Did it all pay off? Looks like it.

Is there still a chance that CBS will dump Colbert and replace him with James Corden? Or flip Colbert and Corden in the schedule? I would say that there is a chance, depending on how much people can take of this new era. We just had the most exhausting week I can remember in presidential politics, and Colbert is tapping into the frustration people are feeling. Jimmy Fallon is certainly not interested in going after the audience that might exist out there for commentary about current political events. He's leaving that to Seth Myers. 

Colbert is filling the void left by the Daily Show, which is not relevant anymore. In the weeks and months ahead, people are going to latch onto an outlet that expresses their frustration. That seems to be happening with Colbert right now. People are connecting with his own personal frustration and it's turning into catharsis.

Welcome Back to the Club

Mel Gibson was nominated for an Oscar today, and there's a good chance he will not win.

Either way, he appears to be "back in the club" known as Hollywood, whatever that means. If the Academy can forgive Gibson, who else can they forgive?

Yeah, That's a Little Nutty

Who among us hasn't believed something nutty before?

Gwyneth Paltrow is hawking a new product on her site Goop called the “Jade Egg.” The object is to be inserted vaginally to “harness the power of energy work, crystal healing, and a Kegel-like physical practice,” one endorsement explains. But one OBGYN was so furious after reading about the eggs she couldn’t hold back. 
“All I can tell you is it is the biggest load of garbage I have read on your site since vaginal steaming,” Dr. Jen wrote on her blog. “It’s even worse than claiming bras cause cancer. But hey, you aren’t one to let facts get in the way of profiting from snake oil.”
The endorsement justifies the use of the jade eggs because “queens and concubines used them to stay in shape for emperors.”

Not only nutty but dangerous as well:

A major warning Dr. Gunter attacked Paltrow’s store for is the idea that a woman should sleep with the jade egg inside of her. Because jade is porous it can introduce dangerous bacteria into the vagina which “could act like a fomite.” Like a kind of smallpox blanket stuck inside.

In other words, avoid using a jade egg.